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Wednesday’s quote

To get you through hump day: “Win or lose you will never regret working hard, making sacrifices, being disciplined or focusing too much. Success is measured by what we have done to prepare for competition.”  – John Smith

Wouldn’t it be nice if coaches studied?

We hear from so many soccer leagues that rely on hundreds of volunteer coaches in their rec soccer program to take online courses or study extensive curriculum designed to create thorough, “progressive” practice sessions. Some may actually do it. But we know that many, maybe most, do not. It is all they can do to find enough time to get to practice after cutting out of work early. What do those folks do at the field? They typically end up just dividing the team into two and scrimmaging. That’s why we designed CoachDeck. The handy deck of cards with 52 good, fundamental drills designed by an A-Licensed coach not only make running a great practice a snap, but since each drill can be made into a fun game, the kids love every minute. It’s a great way for organizations to show appreciation to hard-working volunteers.

Plainview Little League plays today

One of our biggest clients over the years, Plainview (NY) Little League won their all-star state championship and are now vying for the Mid-Atlantic Little League crown! Winner from this tournament punches a coveted ticket to Williamsport and the LLWS! Plainview takes on the New Jersey state champs. Good luck, Plainview!

Tomorrow’s OnDeck Newsletter a Must-Read

You’re going to love the youth sports articles and offers in tomorrow’s OnDeck Newsletter. Subscribe now if you’re not already signed up!

So What if Everybody Gets a Trophy?

By Brian Gotta, President of CoachDeck

Anyone following youth sports has noticed a groundswell of sarcasm and criticism online and in the media about leagues that give out trophies to every kid, just for playing. The general consensus seems to be that this teaches them the poor lesson that they will be rewarded even if they didn’t earn anything. My thought is that we’re focusing on the wrong thing.

I’ve seen at least one viral video of a professional athlete walking with his daughter who has just finished her soccer game and throwing the trophy she was given in the trash. The video was touted as an exemplary piece of parenting. Thousands of views, shares and comments applaud this man, who is obviously physically and mentally stronger than all of us, for showing us how to raise strong children. The phrase “Participation Trophy” has become a pejorative. “Give everyone a ribbon” is a political insult.

As I’m writing this, I wonder what kind of impact this has all had on the trophy industry.

I don’t care if you don’t want to give trophies out to little kids. I don’t happen to think its a big deal. If the children are 5, 6, 7 or 8 years old should we really be focusing on winning and championships? At that age a trophy is not an award for athletic achievement, it’s a memento – a souvenir. My kids got dozens of little trophies for playing various sports when they were young. They liked to put them on their shelf in their room and collect them through the years. They would occasionally point them out to me and ask me if I remembered that team. It was nice. And as for making them weak, all four of my kids went on to play sports collegiality. Two of them are now pros. I don’t think handing them a small faux marble base with a gold plastic statue on top when they were nine did any long-term damage to their psyches.

And yet I will watch tee ball games where a player fields a batted ball, actually throws it to first, the tiny first baseman actually catches it and puts his foot on the base before the runner gets there and….the runner is allowed to stay at first base anyway. The parents are afraid the batter will be devastated if he is the only one who gets called out. What kind of lesson does that teach every player on both teams? Even if the child is upset, can’t we use that as a moment to explain that he did a great job hitting the ball but sometimes when you do your best it still isn’t good enough? That we should respect our opponent and congratulate them on their achievement? That we can use setbacks to motivate us to do better next time? But that would take more work than just letting him stay on base.

One season when I coached pee-wee basketball I spent all my preseason practices teaching my team to do the one thing that was most difficult for them: To dribble and pass the ball so as to move it up the court without traveling. Then, at the first game, the players on the other team are picking up the ball and straight running it down the court, maybe bouncing it one time, and throwing it in the hoop. I asked the referees to actually enforce the rules and call traveling when it occurred. This was not so my team could win, in fact I requested that they let the other players keep the ball. I just wanted the officials to explain to these kids that they had to dribble the ball so they would learn something their coach had obviously not taken the time to teach them. And so that my players would not witness their opponent breaking the rules and gaining an advantage without consequences. So that my team could see the value of the work we did at practice. But this league didn’t think that was important, and no whistles were blown.

Our society seems to want to grab onto the easiest thing it can find…to support, to blame; because that takes much less effort than actually digging in and teaching, learning, doing work, making progress. So the problem with kids and youth sports today is that “everybody gets a trophy”. Doesn’t that strike you as being a little too simple of an explanation?

Brian Gotta is a former youth baseball coach and volunteer Little League board member. He is the President of CoachDeck and also author of four youth sports novels and a baseball coaching book which can be found at www.booksbygotta.com. He can be reached at brian@coachdeck.com

What will you do this weekend?

Playing a little golf? Watching some Little League all-stars? Kicking the soccer ball around with your daughter? Going on a scenic hike? The best way to get ready for our nation’s birthday is to enjoy the freedom we have to do our favorite things. Have a great weekend from CoachDeck!