OnDeck Newsletter Arrives Tomorrow!

Don’t miss this month’s OnDeck Newsletter! From Craig Sigl’s continued series coach communication to Brian Gotta’s first installment of his piece on the decline in youth sports participation and much more, you won’t want to miss it!

Baseball cutoffs and relays – 3 simple tips for instantly faster relays

By Doug Bernier

In baseball cutoffs and relays, split seconds can mean a HUGE momentum shift in the game.

Get that out and now your team is energized. The game is shifting in your favor, and that attitude is contagious. It’s also contagious when that all out effort falls short and the runner is called safe.

It’s more than just one out. It’s the kind of play that can set the tone for the rest of the inning or even the rest of the game.

Every step counts. We can’t afford to waste time by being inefficient with our body movements.

So, thinking ahead and getting into a strategic relay position is a very easy way to see massive improvement in your relay time. Watch the video or read (below) to find out 3 easy ways to shave precious seconds off your baseball cuttoffs and relays.

Baseball cutoffs & relays – 3 Simple Tips for instantly faster relays
Cutoff Speed Tip 1 – Catch the ball on the glove-hand side of your body
Think ahead and get into position to cutoff the baseball by making the catch on your glove side. This will save you precious time and put you into a better position for the relay throw.

Cutoff Speed Tip 2 – Turn to your glove side, not the other way
Turning to the opposite side from your glove requires extra steps, which costs precious time in a cutoff situation. It also creates an awkward momentum that can lead to weaker and less accurate throws. So to be faster, stronger and more accurate, turn to your glove side to make the relay throw.

Cuttof Speed Tip 3 – Get into throwing position earlier
This is something to work up to (because first you have to have a good read on where the throw is going)… Get your body so you’re nearly in throwing position already before you even catch the ball.

All 3 of these tips are simple, but they require thinking ahead and getting into position. Practice them until they’re second nature, and you’ll never have to think about it again!

Use these 3 simple, strategic tips to eliminate inefficiencies in your baseball cutoffs and relays. You’ll have more success throwing out baserunners, and those exciting close plays will work in your favor instead of against you.

Doug Bernier, founder of Pro Baseball Insider.com, debuted in the Major Leagues in 2008 with the Colorado Rockies, and has played professional baseball for 5 organizations (CO Rockies, NY Yankees, Pirates, MN Twins, & TX Rangers) over the past 16 years. He has Major League time at every infield position, and has played every position on the field professionally except for catcher. Where is he now? After a 17-year pro career, Doug has officially retired from playing and is now a scout with the Colorado Rockies. You should click to watch this great defensive play by Bernier

How to Field a Routine Ground Ball

By Doug Bernier

Whether you’re starting from scratch or fine-tuning your approach, this article will teach you how to field a routine ground ball like a Major League baseball player.

First Things

A routine ground ball is hit right at you, your first move is to…

  1. …see what kind of ball is it. Is it a chopper, a ground hugger, or in between?
  2. …how hard is it coming?

The purpose of all this is to compute in your head how you are going to get the ball: Are you going to charge or stay back?

What’s Next

With those two important pieces established, it is time to talk about how to use your feet and properly field ground balls. Remember, these articles are written from the perspective of a right-handed infielder. If you are left handed, you should do it the opposite way.

How to Field a Ground Ball

1. Stay Low.

As you approach the ball, stay low.  This allows you a better view of the hops taken by the baseball.

Also, staying low keeps you in a more athletic position.  It’s easier to come up to meet the baseball than to drop down and get it.

2. Gain ground.

Gain ground on the baseball until the hop makes you stop.  It’s at this moment that you will pick out which hop you want to field the ball.  In other words, decide if you going to get it on the long hop or the short hop.

It is also important during this stage to create the best angle as you advance on the ball.  A “V” shape angle is my preferred approach.  This takes some planning ahead, with the goal being to get yourself in a good position to make the throw after you field the baseball.

Taking a “V” angle to the ball will automatically get you to the right side of the baseball.  Being slightly to the side of the path of the oncoming baseball means you will see it better than if you are directly straight on.  You’ll field the ball in front of your body but slightly to your left – i.e. the left side of your chest is squared up to the baseball (more on this below).

Finally, the “V” angle puts you in a good position to make the throw to first base.

Pro Tip: First Step Quickness

In practice, try to get in front of as many baseballs as possible.  This will (1) improve your range, (2) condition your feet not to be lazy, and (3) best of all, it creates the perception that you have more range than the next guy.

3. Right, Left, Field.

That is, Right foot, Left foot, Field the ball.  This is the rhythm you want to have as you field the baseball.  It will keep you squared up to the ball, and its the same rhythm you’ll use for forehand and backhand plays as well.

4. Small Strides.

If you miss everything else in this article, pay attention to this piece of advice.  Keeping your strides small allows you to make quick adjustments to change direction, accelerate, and decelerate.

The longer your stride, the longer your foot is in the air.  If you are in the air, you can’t make any adjustments until you land.

Next time you’re watching a game on TV, pay attention.  You’ll notice that this is something that all the best infielders do.  If the ball takes a funny hop, they can make a quick adjustment and still make the play.

5. Work through the Baseball.

Your glove should stay in the “zone” as long as possible.  This means keeping a straight wrist and using your arm to move it through the baseball.  (This is especially true if you are backhanding the baseball).

6. Stay Relaxed.

Hands and feet that are relaxed work better.

7. Funnel the Ball to your Chest.

Once you field the ground ball, funnel it to your chest (see image).   In this position, you are balanced and free to move.  Now that your center of gravity is over your feet,  your hands are in a good position to throw and you can shuffle your feet as needed.

8. Don’t Rush.

Most mistakes happen because we try to rush.  You can speed up if needed, but stay in control.  If you are dealing with a fast runner and you feel like you need to be faster, your adjustments should be made in other ways.  You can take a step closer to the batter when getting into your ready position, or even choose to charge the ball rather than wait for it.  These adjustments will buy you more time without making you rush your throw.

Tips from a Pro

I hear many high school and college infield coaches say that they want an infielder to either have their feet squared to the ball or their left foot slightly in front, so they will have momentum and their feet lined up correctly when throwing to first base.
I like to do things a little differently.

  • Glove Position.

    I like to field the ball on the left side of my chest. I am still keeping the ball in front of me but instead of fielding it in the middle of my chest I field it off my left nipple. I do this because this is where my shoulder is and I don’t want to feel that I am reaching in front of my body to field the ball. I would like to field the ball directly underneath my left shoulder. This allows my glove hand to work freely and flow smoothly because I am not fighting my body. Let the glove work from this position.

  • Foot Positioning.

    Ideally I’d like to have my left foot slightly behind my right foot. I like this because I feel that since my glove is on the left side of my body it makes my glove work a lot easier and I don’t have to worry about my left leg getting in the way. I feel I have a lot more room for error I don’t have to be quite so perfect in reading the hops. It makes you work harder to get your feet in the right position to throw to first base, but you have to field it before you can throw it.

  • Making the Throw.

    To make the throw from this position you have two options:

    1. Take your right foot and place it in front of your left foot. Do this instead of placing it behind because when you place it in front your momentum is going towards first instead of falling away slightly. Take a mini hop or a shuffle step (whichever is more comfortable) and make your throw.
    2. Take your right foot and swing it around so your right foot shuffles into your left foot. Make sure you shuffle one more time so your momentum can be in a straight line towards first base. Then make your throw.

Doug Bernier, founder of Pro Baseball Insider.com, debuted in the Major Leagues in 2008 with the Colorado Rockies, and has played professional baseball for 5 organizations (CO Rockies, NY Yankees, Pirates, MN Twins, & TX Rangers) over the past 16 years. He has Major League time at every infield position, and has played every position on the field professionally except for catcher. Where is he now? After a 17-year pro career, Doug has officially retired from playing and is now a scout with the Colorado Rockies. You should click to watch this great defensive play by Bernier

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Baseball Hitting Strategy from TX Rangers Hitting Coach – Part 3

By Doug Bernier

Success at the plate needs smart baseball hitting strategy.

Now that we have been made aware of the offensive situation we are dealing with and we have formed our attack mentality for the at bat (click to go back and read about attainable goals 1 and 2), it’s time to come up with a plan:

What pitch are you trying to hit and in what part of the strike zone?

Hitting Strategy Part 1 – Choose your velocity

By trying to be ready for both fastball (FB) and off-speed (OS) pitches, a hitter will often find his timing isn’t great for either one. The hitter ends up being somewhere in the middle – too slow for the FB and too early for the OS.

Looking hard velocity or softer velocity can simplify an approach that will still allow you to be able to hit the pitches in that group.

Most of the time you should be looking for the hardest pitch the pitcher throws. It is easier to adjust to a slower velocity than to speed up if you are looking soft. Also, it’s more difficult for pitchers to throw their OS for strikes, so laying off of them early on may work to your advantage and put you into a hitters count.

The only exception is if you see a tendency with certain pitchers. For example, sometimes with runners in scoring position some pitchers will throw a first pitch curve ball (which can be a great pitch to hit, especially if you are looking for it). Sometimes in this situation I will look for a curve ball first pitch and if my at bat extends past that first pitch, I’ll go back to looking to hit his fastball.

So, Attainable Goal #3 is to go into your at-bat already knowing the answer to this question….

Are you looking for a fastball (or it’s variations, such as a cutter or sinker, which are similar in velocity)?

Or are you looking for an off speed pitch? Slider, curve ball, change up, etc. These pitches are usually similar in velocity (except sometimes the slider, which could be placed in the harder velocity group, depending on the type of slider and how hard the pitcher is throwing it).

Hitting Strategy Part 2 – Shrink the zone

Now lets take our plan to the next level.

Home plate is 7 baseballs wide. But if we are looking at the strike zone I would say its closer to 8 baseballs wide and lets say 10 baseballs tall.

If we are looking to hit every strike in that 8 x 10 box we are not going to be very successful.

There are high percentage strikes we should swing at (more likely to get good results) and there are low percentage strikes that if we swing at will usually result in weak contact and/or an out.

We need to shrink up our hitting zone until we get to 2 strikes. I like to think of making my own 3 x 3 box within the strike zone. I place this imaginary zone where I most want to hit the baseball.

I can set this up right down the middle and belt high. Maybe I am trying to drive a ball to the opposite field and I set this 3 x 3 zone on the lower, outer half of the strike zone.

Perhaps my swing is feeling pretty good and I’m looking for pitch on the inner part of the plate and looking to drive the ball to my pull side.

This is all good stuff. It’s better to have a plan and have it not work out then go up to the plate with no plan at all.

Example

Here is an example of a more advanced plan.

Let’s say I am a right handed hitter and I am facing a right handed pitcher who is throwing mostly sinkers (a.k.a. 2-seamers).

His goal as a pitcher is to let the down and in movement work for him so the batter will either pull the ball foul or hit a ground ball to the pull side.

This is a very difficult pitch to drive.

When facing these types of pitchers my plan is to move my 3 x 3 box just to the outside part of the center of home plate. I also raise my sights somewhere between mid thigh and my belt.

Even though the pitcher is not trying to throw to the ball to this location, this helps me to not swing at HIS pitch. If he does elevate the sinker or leave it out over the plate it won’t have the same movement and it will be a much easier pitch to hit.

Pro tips – (#1) Keep the plan to your strength as a hitter, but also (#2) realize that it may need some adjusting depending on the pitcher you are facing at that moment.

Having a plan isn’t guaranteed to give us the results we are looking for every time. However, taking your best swing on the pitch and location you wanted will result in better at-bats and better overall production.

Trust in the process which will clear our mind and that will allow you to take your “A” swing on more pitches in the zone that you want to hit.

Doug Bernier, founder of Pro Baseball Insider.com, debuted in the Major Leagues in 2008 with the Colorado Rockies, and has played professional baseball for 5 organizations (CO Rockies, NY Yankees, Pirates, MN Twins, & TX Rangers) over the past 16 years. He has Major League time at every infield position, and has played every position on the field professionally except for catcher. Where is he now? After batting .200 in 45 at-bats and fielding .950 during 2017 spring training with the Rangers, Doug was assigned to the Ranger’s AAA team the Round Rock Express. You should click to watch this great defensive play by Bernier

Mental Side of HItting – Attainable Goals

By Doug Bernier

In the first post called The Mental side of Hitting: Attainable Goals, we talked about how we as hitters are searching for consistency in the batter’s box. (If you missed it, I highly recommend you go back and read it. Otherwise, you’ll miss the importance of what we talking about here.)

Instead of tying our success to how many hits we are getting, having achievable, repeatable objectives (we’re calling them “attainable goals”) will help our consistency and keep our emotions in check.

How do you know when your mentality as a hitter has you headed for trouble?

If you find yourself thinking, “ I need to get 2 hits today,” or “ if I go 3 for 4 I’ll be hitting .270,” or “ it’s ok that we lost, I got my hits today,” then THIS ARTICLE IS FOR YOU.

Like I said before…

Tying your self-worth as a player to getting hits is a guaranteed ticket to an emotional rollercoaster, and in the end, it’s counter-productive to getting the results you want.

We need a more solid mental foundation than that! After 16 years of professional baseball, I can tell you that if you haven’t yet experienced the rollercoaster of emotions that comes with good times and bad times at the plate – YOU WILL.

To get us through, we need something that we can rely on, a mental approach that is proven to increase productivity.

These ideas are from the Lambin Hitting System. Chase Lambin is a Texas Rangers minor league hitting coach. I’ve spoken with many, many hitting coaches over the years, but Lambin’s system really stood out for identifying the important things and for simplifying them into attainable goals that every hitter can work toward.

Attainable Goal 1 – Situational awareness

Being aware of the situation has multiple benefits. In addition to being a mentally stabilizing attainable goal, it also increases the likelihood of getting a hit!

In other words, you are setting yourself up for success, particularly with Step 1.

Step 1 – Studying the pitcher

From the dugout you should be watching and studying the pitcher.

The first thing you should notice is whether the pitcher is right handed or left handed (this tells you which direction his breaking balls will be moving, and more).
What pitches does he throw and with what velocity?
Once you know this you can start to eliminate pitches that he isn’t throwing for strikes.Many times you can get a pitcher to one or two pitches that you actually need to focus on. You only need to worry about pitches that he can throw for strikes.
Next, watch arm angle and talk to hitters that have faced him before you to see how the ball is moving (or not moving) and if he is easy to see or if he has some deception.
Also, if you get to two strikes, how are you planning on dealing with this situation. Does he have an out pitch (a pitch he likes to throw with 2 strikes)?

If you’re ready to get deeper and more advanced into this topic, click here for 4 pro strategies to win your mental battle with the pitcher.

Step 2 – Be aware of situations that could happen when you come up to hit.

This may come as a surprise, but baseball is actually a team sport (shocking, I know).

Sarcasm aside, it’s all too easy for a player to become so focused on himself that he forgets he has a whole team backing him up.

The benefits of this step #2 – being aware of the game situation – is that

(a) it’s an attainable goal you can successfully accomplish every at bat;
(b) you’re creating more opportunities for your team to score; and
(c) What goes around comes around. Be a team player, and it will come back to you eventually.
Now take a look on the bases and know the outs, is there a situation that needs executing?

Possible situations…

Is there a runner at 2nd base with 0 outs and you need to advance him to 3rd base?
Is there a runner at 3rd base with less than 2 outs?
How is the defense playing you and what do you need to do to execute that plan?
Attainable Goal 2 – Aggressive vs Passive Mentality

Are you a lion or a rabbit?

Believe it or not, I’m actually not trying to be funny here.

This can be a difficult self evaluation thought. We all want to be a lion every at-bat, but it’s not always that simple.

When we feel…

uncomfortable in the batter’s box,
are not seeing the baseball well,
trying not to strikeout,
nervous because a pitcher is wild
…these are rabbit thoughts.

These thoughts can pop up from time to time and we need to be able to identify them and get back to attacking and having aggressive thoughts.

Some times the battle between the hitter and the pitcher can be lost even before you get to the plate if you are thinking passive thoughts. Stay aggressive and if you go down, go down attacking.

Once we are ready to hit in the batter’s box (or behind it catching), our goal is to find a way to be 100% confident and ready to do damage all the way until the ball is either hit or caught by the catcher. This 3-5 second period should have no doubt, worry, or fear, penetrate its walls.

Once that pitch is over, its time to re engage mentally and try to get the lion mindset again.

Who is going to win the invisible battle? Are you completely ready to hit? Whose plate is it? Who’s at bat is it? Are you the hunter or the hunted?

Step 1 – Identify – To make this an attainable goal, you need to identify which way your thoughts are leaning.

In between pitches or at-bats take a deep breath and either continue with the aggressive attacking mentality, or realize you are a little passive or defensive and regroup and give yourself assertive and confident self talk.

Step 2 – Making an adjustment.

There is no one way to get your mentality where it needs to be. Find a way that works best for you, to get your mind right when you get into the batters box.

It’s important to remember that nobody can tell themselves to stop thinking something. The thought has to actually be replaced by a new thought. That’s why a mantra can be so effective.

A mantra can help you replace self-defeating thoughts with a simple, confident one without distracting your from being in the moment and focused on the task at hand. Some possible mantras include:

“Bring it“
“I got this.” (Moments before gymnast Laurie Hernandez mounted the balance beam in the women’s team competition, she can barely be seen whispering to herself, “I got this.” Clearly, this mental reminder provided the boost she needed)
“C’mon Meat, throw me that weak-ass shit! “ – the iconic Crash Davis, Bull Durham
“See it. Hit it.”

Believing in yourself and your abilities are important in the mini battles that happen throughout a baseball game.

Being able to identify if your mentality is not a lion mentality is the first step to getting it back to where it needs to be.

Note: Some people need to be relaxed, laughing and smiling, some people need to be more serious and focused. All people get the most out of their abilities differently.

Improving your awareness of “situation and mentality” can help give you a plan at the plate. Being able to do this before you get in the batters box will help keep your mind sharp and get your thoughts off of mechanics and on to executing a plan or a goal.

Doug Bernier, founder of Pro Baseball Insider.com, debuted in the Major Leagues in 2008 with the Colorado Rockies, and has played professional baseball for 5 organizations (CO Rockies, NY Yankees, Pirates, MN Twins, & TX Rangers) over the past 16 years. He has Major League time at every infield position, and has played every position on the field professionally except for catcher. Where is he now? After batting .200 in 45 at-bats and fielding .950 during 2017 spring training with the Rangers, Doug was assigned to the Ranger’s AAA team the Round Rock Express. You should click to watch this great defensive play by Bernier

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Mental Side of Hitting – Part One

By Doug Bernier

Every baseball player struggles from time to time. In these moments of searching for answers it’s easy to fall into the trap of chasing hits.

Tying your self-worth as a player to getting hits is a guaranteed ticket to an emotional rollercoaster, and in the end, it’s counter-productive to getting the results you want.

The mental side of hitting doesn’t need to be a roller coaster – from a pros perspective

During those slumps and moments of struggle, it’s critical to have attainable goals that can be achieved every at-bat.

On any given day, the outcome may not be what we would like – but if we stay consistent with our process and mental plan, the results will follow.

Attainable goals are a series of repeatable objectives the you can control. There are days when you do everything right. You put a beautiful swing on the ball and the outfielder makes a diving catch… and you just don’t get the results you were hoping for.

That’s why it’s important to make your list of attainable goals things that you CAN control. In the next couple posts, I’m going to give you some examples of this, and finally a checklist that I was given by a very smart hitting coach with the Texas Rangers.

The Mental Side of Hitting – Attainable Goals

We choose objectives that force us to pay attention to what is happening on the field and form a mental plan around our strength as a hitter that we feel will give us the best chance of victory for the next battle against the pitcher.

When I would struggle as a youngster I’d hear coaches and parents tell me to “make an adjustment.”

The problem is I only knew 2 adjustments… I’d either choke up on the bat or widen my stance. They were both physical and weren’t able to get me out of a funk or keep me consistent when I was going well.

In 2002, my first year of pro ball is when I saw the importance of having attainable goals as they relate to hitting. The Rockies taught us to work on a mental 2 strike approach as opposed to physical adjustments. Many big leaguers didn’t like to make a physical adjustment with 2 strikes because they were trying to compete with a stance or feel that was not overly practiced. Their thought was, if they were a better hitter by making certain physical adjustments, they would use them the entire at-bat.

One key that I will go into more detail in the next post is having an aggressive vs. passive mindset. Early in my career I had a mindset of “put the ball in play”, “swing at strikes”, “work the count”,”hit the ball on the ground.” I thought this was how a smaller guy with not a lot of power was supposed to hit. In some cases I was taught to think like this at the plate. I was constantly feeding myself passive thoughts.

One of my attainable goals was to realize this passive self talk and change it. I started to think, “hit this pitch off the center field wall”, “drive this ball in the gap”, “hit this ball hard”. This simple goal of changing my self talk is one key that turned me into a more aggressive hitter that drives the ball much more than I did early in my career.

The Mental Side of Hitting – Creating a plan that works for YOU

During most of my pro playing career, I struggled to explain this process with clarity. Then I talked to Texas Rangers minor league hitting coach, Chase Lambin who I played against for years. This guy was a grinder who got everything out of his ability. He has been really trying to relay this information to his players and he has helped me a lot to simplify this mental process.

Next:  Explanation of this process in great detail about concrete, attainable goals

Doug Bernier, founder of Pro Baseball Insider.com, debuted in the Major Leagues in 2008 with the Colorado Rockies, and has played professional baseball for 5 organizations (CO Rockies, NY Yankees, Pirates, MN Twins, & TX Rangers) over the past 16 years. He has Major League time at every infield position, and has played every position on the field professionally except for catcher. Where is he now? After batting .200 in 45 at-bats and fielding .950 during 2017 spring training with the Rangers, Doug was assigned to the Ranger’s AAA team the Round Rock Express. You should click to watch this great defensive play by Bernier

How to Field Like a Pro

By Doug Bernier

Everyone loves offense, but pitching and defense win games.  These pro tips for how to field a baseball will help you win games.

Tip #1: The Secret is to Use Your Feet

Many smooth fielders look like they have soft hands, but it is actually their feet that allow their hands to work so freely. In other words, FOOTWORK COUNTS! The better your footwork, the easier your glove work becomes and the smoother it looks. Once you stop your feet, your risk of letting the baseball dictate what is going to happen skyrockets. When your feet shut down, your hands follow, and your body tends to get stiff. So keeping your feet moving is a huge key. This is something I will explain in more detail in the following articles on fielding.

Tip #2: Position your Glove for Maximum Benefit

Another MUST for fielding ground balls is to take your glove hand and push the heel of your wrist toward the baseball (see pictures below). Ideally you want it more perpendicular than parallel to the ground. This allows you to use all of your glove. It will also prevent balls that take a little hop from rolling up your arm. This is something many infielders don’t get taught but helps a lot when the baseball takes a late tricky hops. To illustrate, this glove position (below) is NOT ideal, because doesn’t make full use of the glove’s surface area:

how to field a baseball - wrong way view 1

Wrong

How to field a baseball - This is what NOT to do, view 2

Wrong

 

 

 

 

 

 

This position (below) is much better because it lets you use the entire surface area of the glove, and it doesn’t allow balls that take late hops roll up your arm.  You’d be surprised how many fielders overlook this important detail.

How to field a ground ball in baseball - correct, view 1

Correct

Proper mechanics of how to field a baseball - correct, view 2

Correct

 

 

A good drill that incorporates proper glove position and moving your feet.  Start with your arm and glove exactly how you want to field the baseball.  Now when a ground ball is hit, move your feet ONLY and don’t move your hand or glove.  Use your feet to get the baseball.  Pre set your glove and field with your feet.  If you can get good at this drill you will make fielding a lot easier.

While we’re at it, here are a few more defensive tips for how to field a baseball.  Each of these tips will be talked about in more detail, in some of the following defensive articles.

  • Keep it natural

    When fielding a ground ball, do not make your glovehand cross your body. It is NOT ideal to catch the baseball in the center of your body or to your right side, but rather more to the side of your glove hand.  In other words, the ball, your glove, and your left pectoral should be in a straight line. This allows your glove to work more freely in front of you, since it doesn’t have to slide across your body. When the left hand is trying to work on the right side of the body, people tend to get tense. This is when mistakes happen.

  • Keep your hands extended

    This is for two reasons: (a) the ball and glove are always in your line of vision (!!!!); and (b) on a bad hop, you still have room to bring your glove into your body to make the play.

  • Relax your glove hand

    Relax your glove hand while fielding a ball. All of your reflexes are quicker when you are relaxed. Also, the ball seems to stick in your glove easier without tensing up and fighting it.

  • Start low

    With a short hop from a throw or a hard hit ball, start with your glove on the ground and work up to field this ball. These are very difficult plays, but it is easier and quicker to move up than down.

  • Attack

    Attack with your glove but most importantly with your mentality.  It is necessary to have an aggressive (but under control) attitude when approaching a ground ball.  A quality infielder dictates how he is going to field the ground ball.  A below average infielder lets the ball dictate how he is going to field the ball.

  • Stay balanced

    When the ball is secure in your glove, bring it to your chest. Keeping the ball in the middle of your body helps keep you balanced and in a strong position to throw.

  • Left arm as your guide

    After your glove is at your chest, get your shoulders turned to the base you are throwing to. Use your left shoulder and elbow, as your guide, keeping them in line with the base you are throwing to.

  • A Four Seam Grip is a must for an infielder

    Every time you throw a baseball, get a four-seam grip on the ball. This means your index and middle finger are across the horseshoe. No matter where on the ball your fingers are, you are never more than a quarter-turn of the ball away from getting that ideal 4-seam grip. This may seem difficult, but all infielders do this. This grip keeps the ball flying straight and with the proper backspin, and will help your throws to be more accurate. If you only get a two-seam, one-seam, or no seam grip, the ball will most likely sink, run, or dive. So work on getting a four-seam grip every time. (Click here to get these tips in a printable cheatsheet.)

    Doug Bernier, founder of Pro Baseball Insider.com, debuted in the Major Leagues in 2008 with the Colorado Rockies, and has played professional baseball for 5 organizations (CO Rockies, NY Yankees, Pirates, MN Twins, & TX Rangers) over the past 16 years. He has Major League time at every infield position, and has played every position on the field professionally except for catcher. Where is he now? After batting .200 in 45 at-bats and fielding .950 during 2017 spring training with the Rangers, Doug was assigned to the Ranger’s AAA team the Round Rock Express

Where You Fit in the Baseball Lineup

By Doug Bernier

A good hitting philosophy should definitely depend on what kind of hitter you are. Are you a player that hits for a lot of power, do you try to set the table and get on base for the middle of the lineup, can you run, are you a good situational hitter, can you hit to all parts of the field or do you mostly just pull the ball.

Accurately evaluating yourself and knowing what kind of hitter you are can be difficult. The great thing about baseball is there is room on every team and in the big leagues for all types of hitters.

Players get in trouble when they want to be something they are not. This is fairly common and a problem most young hitters face. Everyone wants to hit homeruns. But not everyone was talented in that area. If you hit one homerun a year and most of your outs are fly balls, you are only hurting yourself.

The good hitters use what they are given and use it to the best of their ability. If you can run, hit balls on the ground and utilize the bunt. If you can handle the bat, try to hit the 3-4 hole (in between 1st and 2nd base) with a runner on 1st base, to get the runner to move up to 3rd base. Some hitters are trying to get on base any way possible, while others are in scoring position when they step up to the plate. Understand your game, and embrace it.

What Makes Up A Typical Baseball Lineup

The leadoff hitter

The typical leadoff hitter can usually run. He has a high on base percentage, good average and takes his walks. The leadoff hitter can handle the bat by bunting, good hit and run guy and doesn’t strike out a lot. He can create havoc on the bases when necessary.

The 2, 8, and 9 hitters

These guys are table setters, they can handle the bat. You need to be able to bunt, situationaly hit ( hit and run, hit a ball to the right side with a runner on second and 0 outs, sacrifice fly with runner on third.) These players should be gritty and battle.

Just because you hit eighth or ninth doesn’t mean you are not an important hitter. At some point all hitters, no matter where in the baseball lineup they are, will be up in a big situation.
If you are hitting in the spot before the pitcher (usually 8th) that can be a tough assignment. You will usually be pitched very carefully. The pitcher hopes you will expand the zone and swing at bad pitches. With runners on base don’t be surprised to get off speed pitches in fastball counts and fastballs that are meant for the corners of the plate. They know if you walk they have a weak hitter behind you, but they are hoping to get you to chase and get yourself out.
The number 3 hitter

The number 3 hitter is usually your best in the lineup. He most times will have a unique blend of batting average and power. He hits in this spot to drive in runners, and he is guaranteed to hit in the first inning. He can put runs on the board.

The 4 and 5 guys

are usually power guys that may strike out more than the others in the lineup but have long ball potential. Every time they step in the box they strike fear into their opponents.

The 6 and 7 guys

are very good hitters usually high average with a little less power than the 3,4,5 guys. They are very important to protect the power spots in the baseball lineup by hitting well and driving in runners. The 6 and 7 spots in the lineup can have big RBI potential. A team that has strong 6 and 7 hole hitters makes the baseball lineup so much deeper and a lot more difficult to pitch to.

This is a very basic template of a typical baseball lineup, this can change depending on the teams personnel in the lineup. Possible changes might include:

Your leadoff hitter may have the most power but he hits there because he doesn’t strike out very often and the coach wants him to get as many at bats as possible.
Your number 3 hitter may have no power at all but he hits for a high average and has been pretty successful with driving runners in. He is not your prototypical 3 hole hitter, but can be very productive in the 3rd slot.

I hope this overview of the baseball lineup can help you determine your own personal hitting philosophy and where you fit in the lineup.

Doug Bernier, founder of Pro Baseball Insider.com, debuted in the Major Leagues in 2008 with the Colorado Rockies, and has played professional baseball for 5 organizations (CO Rockies, NY Yankees, Pirates, MN Twins, & TX Rangers) over the past 16 years. He has Major League time at every infield position, and has played every position on the field professionally except for catcher. Where is he now? After batting .200 in 45 at-bats and fielding .950 during 2017 spring training with the Rangers, Doug was assigned to the Ranger’s AAA team the Round Rock Express.
(Originally Posted at www.probaseballinsider.com)