Custom Football Gloves

Did you know that our partners at Upstart Sports did custom football gloves too? We already told you about their custom batting gloves. If you’re involved in a youth football league or high school team, their custom gloves make a great spirit pack item or just terrific option to enhance your team’s uniform.

Simple Fundraising Tips for a Grand-Slam Fundraiser!

Below are some excellent tips from our partners at Just Fundraising.

 

Often, a team fundraising manager can put in endless hours of effort organizing, following up, and reporting on their fundraiser, only to have the fundraiser yield dismal financial results. Here are 3 important pointers that will significantly increase your chance of fundraising success.

1- Know WHY you are fundraising and communicate it throughout your fundraiser.

When parents and players know WHY they are running a fundraiser, the results are always better. It gives the fundraiser more purpose, and with purpose comes people’s desire to step-up to the plate and help. Another key reason to communicate your WHY to your participants, is so they can pass on the message to their potential supporters, who will often be more generous when they know WHY they are supporting your team instead of just WHAT they are buying. Wouldn’t you buy more than 1 chocolate bar if you knew the team would be representing your city in their very first out-of-state tournament? Would you be more open to buying a $15 tub of cookie dough, if you knew the city had recently cut the local budget for youth sports, and that the teams’ 4 year-old uniforms needed replacing? When you communicate WHY you are fundraising, you appeal to your supporters’ emotions, and they will naturally want to help you.

2- Establish your precise fundraising goals.

When our sales team asks coaches and group leaders how much they need to raise, 90% of the time, the answer is ‘as much as possible!’ By having a vague or unrealistic target, you’ve already taking the energy out of your fundraiser. Most participants need to know what effort and results are expected of them in order to reach a pre-determined meaningful goal. If not, they simply won’t be as motivated and many will take the easy route, and sell a bare minimum. If your overall goal is to raise $750, the exact amount needed to cover your 2 tournaments this season, and if you have 15 players on your team, then each child needs to bring in a minimum of $50 profit. If you’re selling products (i.e. gourmet popcorn), and making $5 profit per unit sold, then you should set a clear goal for each player to sell a minimum of 10 units each. If you want to encourage more sales, add more prizes over the 10 unit mark, and let your team know before-hand where any extra funds raised will be allocated.

3- Communicate! Communicate! Communicate!

A great location is to business, what great communication is to fundraising.

Prepare them… Before the fundraiser kick-off, it would be a good idea to let parents know of your team’s budgetary shortfalls, and the need to fundraise, so that they’re not surprised when they are asked to fundraise.

Kick-Off … Even if this is just a team fundraiser, it’s important to have an official fundraiser kick-off, with all of the parents and children. It’s the perfect opportunity to create team spirit and to talk about how much greater your season will be thanks to everyone’s expected fundraising efforts. It’s also a great idea to have a few kids do a role-play of the perfect sales pitch in front of all, so they can all see how it’s done!

Parent Letter … Make sure you write up a parent letter specifying the important dates, reminding them why this fundraiser is so important, and noting their expected sales obligations,.

Follow-up … once or twice per week, take the opportunity to highlight the players who are doing a great job selling, to share their selling strategies and to encourage all to keep up their fundraising efforts so they reach their individual and team fundraising targets.

JustFundraising’s How to Start a Fundraiser guide has more in-depth tips and ideas to help teams, schools, and other groups run a successful fundraiser.

Michael Jones is a writer at JustFundraising.com. He has 16 years of experience helping sports teams, schools, church organizations, community groups and charities reach their fundraising objectives

Illinois works to prevent concussions in youth football

Illinois Governer Bruce Rauner recently signed a law that mandates the King-Devick test be used to prevent and diagnose concussions in grade school players. WGN has the full story. It appears the King-Devick test might be something every youth sports organization should use.

Youth football practices begin soon

We love this time of year when Pop Warner and other youth football practice is about to begin. Coaches, did you know we make a deck of 52 good, fundamental drill cards you can carry in your back pocket? Perfect for that quick, practice “pick-me-up” or to plan out the entire thing! You can even give cards to assistant coaches and have the offensive line, d-line, backs, quarterbacks and special teams all in on the act. And, every drill comes with a unique, “make it a game” feature that turns an ordinary drill into a fun and exciting competition kids love.

CoachDeck for Pop Warner

With Pop Warner practices soon to start we thought it would be prudent to mention that our CoachDeck for Football is a great resource for those volunteer coaches. With drills for offense, defense and special teams, cards can be divvied up among assistants so that one deck can be shared by an entire team. It’s excellent for forming practice plans or even just new ideas on the fly. http://www.coachdeck.com.

Give so that others may play

Yesterday we were listening to a radio interview with two African-American activists who were discussing the inner-city crime problem in America. One of the participants brought up after school programs and the aspect of kids who are home alone without supervision and nothing to do. He mentioned that many of them would like to play a sport, say football for instance, but that it might cost $400-$500 to be able to play and that many of their parents, not home because they’re working two jobs, can’t afford to pay that. Consequently, these kids fall in with the wrong crowd and end up in trouble.

Our friends at Protex Sports want to do something about just this issue. Their Protex Sports Foundation is a non-profit designed to raise money for underprivileged athletes who need financial assistance. It is one of the best causes we can imagine and hope you’ll not only help, but will get the word out to others as well.

Football doesn’t seem to be going anywhere

Despite all of the new and widely-publicized concern over head injuries and concussions in football, it appears parents are not holding their kids back from playing the sport at the youth level. This article explains, among other things, how Pop Warner participation has held steady…good news for the future of the sport.