Wouldn’t it be nice if coaches studied?

We hear from so many soccer leagues that rely on hundreds of volunteer coaches in their rec soccer program to take online courses or study extensive curriculum designed to create thorough, “progressive” practice sessions. Some may actually do it. But we know that many, maybe most, do not. It is all they can do to find enough time to get to practice after cutting out of work early. What do those folks do at the field? They typically end up just dividing the team into two and scrimmaging. That’s why we designed CoachDeck. The handy deck of cards with 52 good, fundamental drills designed by an A-Licensed coach not only make running a great practice a snap, but since each drill can be made into a fun game, the kids love every minute. It’s a great way for organizations to show appreciation to hard-working volunteers.

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CoachDeck Soccer client feedback

Below is some terrific feedback we received from a client using our CoachDeck for soccer. Every coach needs a CoachDeck!

Yes I recieved the deck, and my initial thoughts are great. The drills look easy to do and learn from a coaching perspective and a young player perspective. 

I was finally able to use 2 of the drills Monday evening. First Time Shooting and Bumpout. Both of which were easy to set up and the kids loved doing it. 

I love the soccer balls indicating difficulty so I can try to pick from the easier ones to start and build up. 

Personally I have a difficult time figuring out soccer drills because soccer doesn’t come to me as naturally as basketball does. So when I plan a soccer practice I’m nervous to find great skill oriented drills and I’m not sure if it will necessarily be any fun. 

Then when I find a drill online I have to reread it many times to figure out what exactly to do. With CoachDeck, after you get familiar with the terminology, a quick look twice over the card and im confident and ready to go!

I can definitely see a first time coach having a much easier time preparing for practice with CoachDeck. Also a coach like myself that’s been doing it for a couple of years, I’m less stressed knowing I have plenty of drills if I don’t have time to sit down and search for drills online. 

I definitely love the product!

CoachDeck in North America

Did you know folks are using CoachDeck in all fifty states and every province in Canada? Here is a partial list of who is using CoachDeck. We have become the most trusted resource for volunteer coaches in North America, and we’d like to thank you!

Make Them Want to Come Back

By Brian Gotta, President of CoachDeck

Over the past ten years I’ve written many articles on youth sports. One of my original and most often repeated comments is that your first goal as a coach should be that every player wants to come back and play again next season. Regardless of wins, losses, or anything else, if you accomplish this, you’ve succeeded. But how do you do this?

The first thing to realize is that you are the conduit between the player and the sport you are coaching. You represent the sport to the player. It will be difficult for a young player to like the sport, but not like the coach. One of the main reasons youngsters quit sports at an early age is not that they didn’t enjoy the game itself – but rather, they did not like the person managing the team.

So make them like you. The easiest and most obvious way to do that is to smile. Doesn’t mean you can’t ever be stern or serious, but when the players are showing up at the field, make each one feel like you’re glad to see them. Set the tone by joking around a little with them during warm-ups. I used to try to make a nickname for every player at the beginning of the season. Some didn’t stick, but a few did and the kids loved it. You can be serious once practice starts, and it’s OK to bring some intensity based on the age level you’re coaching. But be sure that every criticism is balanced by something else the player did well, (e.g. “You’ve got to watch that ball all the way in. But I like the way you used two hands.”)

Part of making them like you is running fun practices. A serious practice that teaches fundamentals and pushes players to perform can still be fun. I’ve recently seen several drill videos put out by national organizations designed to help their volunteer coaches. In them a professional coach demonstrates how to perform a particular skill, then proceeds to have 2-3 players mimic his actions. Not only is the drill boring, but when have you ever run a practice for just two or three players? Apparently the other ten kids are standing off-camera just watching. Each drill should be made into a game involving every player. All of the drills in our deck of cards have a “Make it a Game” feature that turns an ordinary drill into a competition the entire team will love.

What about being competitive and trying to win? Much of what is written about the “ills” of youth sports blames coaches who only care about stroking their own egos with victories, even if it is at the expense of some of the kids. And much of that is legitimate. Clearly, it is important to judge your audience. I’ve written many articles about when it is OK to get more serious about winning and how far it should be taken – I don’t intend to get into that here.

But when I coached in the Majors Division of Little League, (ages 10-12) we wanted to win. And just about every other coach in the league did too. The kids wanted to win also. Skeptics will say we were over-the-top, that it shouldn’t be about winning at that age. It wasn’t only about winning, but we did try our best to win. One might say that philosophy is bad for the players who aren’t stars on the team, but I disagree. Because we made it a point after every game to go player-by-player and highlight something each individual did to help the team. In fact, we worked even harder to give recognition to the players who didn’t usually contribute as much. If we weren’t all trying to win, that praise wouldn’t have been as significant. And when a youngster with just average ability rose up and did something great and made a huge, positive difference in a game, the thrill he got, the adulation from his teammates, that one moment might be enough to make him want to come back again next season. And when it’s all said and done, that’s exactly what we’re trying to accomplish.

Brian Gotta is a former professional youth baseball coach and current volunteer Little League coach and board member. He is the President of CoachDeck and also author of four youth sports novels and a baseball coaching book which can be found at www.booksbygotta.com. He can be reached at brian@coachdeck.com

View the latest OnDeck Newsletters

Yesterday’s OnDeck Newsletters were spectacular, if we do say so ourselves! If you missed them, don’t despair! Check out Tuesday’s issues and all previous editions here. Enjoy!

What better investment?

Youth leagues with motivated, capable coaches have more dynamic and fun practices. Kids who participate in more exciting practices are more likely to want to come back and play every year, and tell their friends how great the experience is. That’s why so many leagues have chosen to provide their coaches with our CoachDeck, a handy and user-friendly deck of cards with 52 good, fundamental drills broken into four color-coded categories designed so that volunteer youth coaches can run terrific practices, “on the fly” even if they have no prior coaching experience.

Why do more kids and coaches come back?

Leagues using CoachDeck tell us that not only do more coaches volunteer to return season after season because they felt like they did a more capable job of running practices, but because children better-enjoyed those fun and productive practices, more of them wanted  to come back and play again the next year. If you’re interested in creating the healthiest and most dynamic league experience possible for your coaches and players, CoachDeck can help!