You Are The Ref Roy Hodgson

We have a couple more installments coming of The Guardian UK’s “You Are the Ref”,  the classic from Paul Trevillion. Answers will follow each day.

Roy Hodgson You are the Ref

You Are The Ref Gareth Bale answers

Here are Keith Hackett’s answers to yesterday’s “You Are the Ref puzzler”. If you missed it, you can view it here.

1) You cannot give a goal based on what the technology is telling you, because the frame of the goal has been totally compromised. So stop play immediately and signal for the groundstaff to replace the goal. Once that is done to your satisfaction, ask the Hawk-Eye engineers to re-calibrate their system, then restart with a dropped ball on the six-yard line parallel to the goal line. Thanks to Richard Alford.
2) Was it a deliberate act? You would be hard pushed to be certain of that – in all probability it was an accident. So that’s how I would treat it: stop play and restart with a dropped ball. Thanks to Gareth Pritchard.
3) It seems bizarre, but, then again, last month the Atlético Madrid assistant coach German Burgos was pictured using this technology while sitting on the bench. So take a look at the glasses, and if they do incorporate the technology insist that they are removed and report the matter to the authorities. The laws state players and staff are not allowed to use electronic communication systems, and I would extend that to this device too.

You Are The Ref Gareth Bale

In admiration of our favorite soccer comic strip, The Guardian UK’s “You Are the Ref”, we bring you the fourth in a week’s worth of installments of the classic from Paul Trevillion. Answers will follow each day.

Gareth Bale You are the Ref

You Are The Ref FA Cup final special answers

Here are Keith Hackett’s answers to yesterday’s “You Are the Ref puzzler”. If you missed it, you can view it here.

1) Another scenario that shows you need to be ready for anything. In theory this should not happen: competition regulations will mean these details are set out well in advance – and for Uefa games a meeting takes place at 10.30am on the day to check team colours, logo sizes, ball boy colours, warm up bib colours and other details. However, there is nothing in the rules to stop teams changing to an alternative strip at half-time, unless it would mean a colour clash – remember Manchester United and those famous “invisible” grey shirts at Southampton in 1996? So allow the swap to take place.
2) It’s all in the timing. If you were whistling as the defender caught the ball, that’s fine: arrange treatment and restart with a dropped ball. But if not, you need to take action. Players should not be taking the law into their own hands, whatever the motive. So award a penalty kick, signal for the medics to come on – and, if the ball was going in, show the defender a red card. Thanks to Bongai Jinguri.
3) Play the game. The colour of line markings is not covered in the Laws – they just need to be distinct. Clubs often use green sand to cover over any confusing lines. Thanks to James Francis.

You Are the Ref FA Cup final special

In admiration of our favorite soccer comic strip, The Guardian UK’s “You Are the Ref”, we bring you the third in a week’s worth of installments of the classic from Paul Trevillion. Answers will follow each day.

You are the Ref Fa Cup

You Are The Ref Louis van Gaal Answers

Here are the answers to yesterday’s “You Are the Ref puzzler”. If you missed it, you can view it here.

1) An interesting one. Before the game starts teams must fill out a form detailing who will be in the technical area – but there is no requirement that the named individuals must actually stay in the technical area at all times. So there is no real reason to prevent this approach. Your assistants will have checked the subs’ equipment before kick-off, and your fourth official will deal with the substitution process as required in the game. Just make sure that the equipment is checked again before players come on.
2) The game has not re-started, so you can change your mind. Controversial incidents are not supposed to be shown on big screens, but it is important your decisions are correct, so, based on what you saw, disallow the goal and explain what has happened to the players. The club can expect a sanction though for breaking the rules on replays.Thanks to Steven Hallmark.
3) Call the keeper and his captain over to you, away from the incident, and tell them that as you did not hear anything, you will not be taking immediate action – but you will be reporting what has been alleged to the authorities. Also, ask the ground controller to place extra security behind the goal. Thanks to Philip Hornsey.

You Are The Ref Louis van Gaal

In admiration of our favorite soccer comic strip, The Guardian UK’s “You Are the Ref”, we bring you the second in a week’s worth of installments of the classic from Paul Trevillion. Answers will follow each day.

Louis van Gaal You are the Ref

You Are The Ref Ross Barkley Answers

Here are Keith Hackett’s answers to yesterday’s “You Are the Ref puzzler”. If you missed it, you can view it here.

1) No – await the outcome. If a goal is scored, allow it to stand, then caution the keeper for unsporting behaviour. But if the keeper succeeds in putting the striker off, send him off for denying an obvious goal-scoring opportunity. In that situation, restart with an indirect free-kick from where the “live” ball was when you stopped play. Thanks to Aswin Jay. 2) A grim situation. Advise the home team captain that, in the interests of crowd safety, the best option is to continue with the match, and leave it to the authorities to make an assessment after the final whistle. Include everything that took place in your report, allowing the competition to decide whether or not to order a replay. Thanks to Mark Goodge. 3) Once the penalty taker has taken the kick he cannot have any further participation – but the keeper can attempt to play the ball again. So in this case the striker is guilty of unsporting behaviour in preventing the keeper from doing so. Disallow the goal, because a retake would give the taker’s team an advantage they do not deserve.

You Are The Ref Ross Barkley

In admiration of our favorite soccer comic strip, The Guardian UK’s “You Are the Ref”, we bring you the first in a week’s worth of installments of the classic from Paul Trevillion. Answers will follow each day.

You are the Ref Ross Barkley

Answer to Wednesday’s “You Are the Ref”

Below are the answers to yesterday’s, “You Are the Ref”, the classic cartoon strip, (Courtesy Guardian UK). If you didn’t see the original post, take look here, but don’t peek below first!

1) Play on: there’s no reason to order a retake. No one is at fault here other than the penalty taker. He slipped and scuffed his shot – and the fact that he did not directly make contact with the ball is irrelevant. It is enough that his kick caused the ball to move forward. (Thanks to Richard Gibbon.)
2) The managers are right to suspect that the authorities would order a replay in these circumstances, and their reluctance to go through it all again in a busy season is understandable. However, it is your decision, not theirs. You need to judge it on whether a) there is enough visibility to avoid it being a farce; b) whether there is any risk to player safety; c) whether it is reasonable to have half the shoot-out played in very different conditions; and d) whether the paying public can see it properly. I would complete the shoot-out if at all possible, then leave it to the authorities to determine whether or not the result stands. (Thanks to Patrick Finnis.)
3) You cannot go ahead: a size 5 ball is mandatory in senior football. Delay the re-start in the hope that staff can recover one of the balls from outside the stadium. If they cannot, you have to abandon. (Thanks to Jason Chau.)