Youth baseball and softball ramping up

It’s only January, and much of North America is under the grips of Old Man Winter. But behind the scenes, the volunteers are coming out of hibernation to begin plans and preparation for the spring 2018 baseball and softball seasons. It won’t be long before we see them on the fields raking, digging, seeding and watering. If you happen by and offer to help, you won’t be turned away!

Advertisements

Dear Coach, I Play On Your Team

By Brian Gotta, President of CoachDeck

Dear Coach. I am one of the players on your team. I am too young to understand that you volunteer to be my coach and that you are not an expert. I don’t know what you do away from the field, I only know you as “Coach”. But I thought maybe it would be good if you knew something about me.

I like watching sports on TV, playing video games, riding my skateboard and going places with my family, especially when we can bring our dog, Misty. My favorite foods are pizza and my mom’s mac and cheese.

This is my fourth season playing and I’m probably not the best at it but I think I’m pretty good. Sometimes I go out in the backyard or down to the park and practice with my dad but he’s really busy so not as much as I would like. I practice by myself sometimes too.

The first coach I ever had was really nice and he called everyone, “Buddy”. I liked that and I liked him. I think our team was really good but I can’t really remember. I know that twice he said after the game while we were having our snack that I was “Player of the Game”. I think there were a lot of players of the game that year but I was proud I got named that those times.

The first few times I went to practice that year I was really scared because I had never done it before and the coach was bigger than my dad and had a loud voice. I got used to it though and at the end of the year almost everyone on my team was one of my best friends.

The second year, I had a different coach. He didn’t call everyone Buddy, but it was better because he came up with nicknames for all of us. I was “Alligator”. I don’t really know why but that’s what he called me. When practice was over Coach would always say, “See you later, Alligator.” and it was funny. What I liked about this coach was that he made everything a game. If he thought we should practice running, he made it a race. When we practiced other stuff it was always half of us against the other half. I think our team was pretty good that year too. I am pretty sure we won a lot of games.

The coach I had last year was not my favorite. He was always talking to us about winning, which is fine because I want to win, but it was more the way he did it. He would say things to some of the kids, including me, that made me feel bad. He’d say we were hurting the team and that we didn’t “want it.” enough. I thought I wanted it plenty, though I’m not sure what “it” is. He would always make the team run when he was mad and he was mad a lot. He would yell at us when he got really mad. Sometimes my mom and dad yell at each other at home and I hate it. So when he did it, it reminded me of that.

This coach would tell us to do things we didn’t understand and then act like we were not paying attention when we didn’t do it right. When all-stars were picked last year I wasn’t on it. I thought I should have been but when the coach announced who made it he said they deserved it. So I guess I didn’t.

I told my parents I might not want to play this year but they said that was silly and that of course I was going to play again, so they signed me up. I know this is a new level I’m at now and that we have some good players. I think I will be able to help the team just as much as them. But I’m also afraid of making mistakes.

No matter what happens, I hope you know I’m trying my best.

Thank you, Coach.

Brian Gotta is a former youth baseball coach and volunteer Little League board member. He is the President of CoachDeck and also author of four youth sports novels and a baseball coaching book which can be found at www.booksbygotta.com. He can be reached at brian@coachdeck.com

What’s the earliest baseball or softball registration?

We’re looking for the youth baseball or softball league that opens their Spring 2018 registration the earliest. For most in the country this seems like a long ways away, but there are leagues in Southern California, Florida and other warm-climate states that are already meeting and planning for ’18. When does your spring registration begin? Email us at customerservice@coachdeck.com and let us know!

Youth baseball and softball participation rising!

After years of hearing “doom and gloom” about the declining number of kids playing baseball and softball, finally some great news. The Sports & Fitness Industry Association has released a report showing that participation levels are improving and improving dramatically. This clearly bodes well for both sports’ futures and for our nation’s youth. (Courtesy Fox Sports and Ken Rosenthal).

As fair as it can get for selecting all-stars

We found a link on the City of Christiansburg (VA) website explaining their selection process for baseball and softball all-stars. It mirrors the selection process we published in 2012, adding the additional component of an independently-assessed tryout. For transparency and fairness, we highly recommend all leagues adopt one of these processes, or something similar.

What day is today?

Of course…it’s Friday! Time to get ready for a weekend of youth baseball, softball or soccer. Or basketball, or football or walking, jogging, going to the gym, hiking, biking, anything that gets you active and energized. The weather shouldn’t be an excuse this weekend. And you can rest your sore muscles Sunday afternoon watching the final round of The Masters!

Simple Fundraising Tips for a Grand-Slam Fundraiser!

Below are some excellent tips from our partners at Just Fundraising.

 

Often, a team fundraising manager can put in endless hours of effort organizing, following up, and reporting on their fundraiser, only to have the fundraiser yield dismal financial results. Here are 3 important pointers that will significantly increase your chance of fundraising success.

1- Know WHY you are fundraising and communicate it throughout your fundraiser.

When parents and players know WHY they are running a fundraiser, the results are always better. It gives the fundraiser more purpose, and with purpose comes people’s desire to step-up to the plate and help. Another key reason to communicate your WHY to your participants, is so they can pass on the message to their potential supporters, who will often be more generous when they know WHY they are supporting your team instead of just WHAT they are buying. Wouldn’t you buy more than 1 chocolate bar if you knew the team would be representing your city in their very first out-of-state tournament? Would you be more open to buying a $15 tub of cookie dough, if you knew the city had recently cut the local budget for youth sports, and that the teams’ 4 year-old uniforms needed replacing? When you communicate WHY you are fundraising, you appeal to your supporters’ emotions, and they will naturally want to help you.

2- Establish your precise fundraising goals.

When our sales team asks coaches and group leaders how much they need to raise, 90% of the time, the answer is ‘as much as possible!’ By having a vague or unrealistic target, you’ve already taking the energy out of your fundraiser. Most participants need to know what effort and results are expected of them in order to reach a pre-determined meaningful goal. If not, they simply won’t be as motivated and many will take the easy route, and sell a bare minimum. If your overall goal is to raise $750, the exact amount needed to cover your 2 tournaments this season, and if you have 15 players on your team, then each child needs to bring in a minimum of $50 profit. If you’re selling products (i.e. gourmet popcorn), and making $5 profit per unit sold, then you should set a clear goal for each player to sell a minimum of 10 units each. If you want to encourage more sales, add more prizes over the 10 unit mark, and let your team know before-hand where any extra funds raised will be allocated.

3- Communicate! Communicate! Communicate!

A great location is to business, what great communication is to fundraising.

Prepare them… Before the fundraiser kick-off, it would be a good idea to let parents know of your team’s budgetary shortfalls, and the need to fundraise, so that they’re not surprised when they are asked to fundraise.

Kick-Off … Even if this is just a team fundraiser, it’s important to have an official fundraiser kick-off, with all of the parents and children. It’s the perfect opportunity to create team spirit and to talk about how much greater your season will be thanks to everyone’s expected fundraising efforts. It’s also a great idea to have a few kids do a role-play of the perfect sales pitch in front of all, so they can all see how it’s done!

Parent Letter … Make sure you write up a parent letter specifying the important dates, reminding them why this fundraiser is so important, and noting their expected sales obligations,.

Follow-up … once or twice per week, take the opportunity to highlight the players who are doing a great job selling, to share their selling strategies and to encourage all to keep up their fundraising efforts so they reach their individual and team fundraising targets.

JustFundraising’s How to Start a Fundraiser guide has more in-depth tips and ideas to help teams, schools, and other groups run a successful fundraiser.

Michael Jones is a writer at JustFundraising.com. He has 16 years of experience helping sports teams, schools, church organizations, community groups and charities reach their fundraising objectives